Flyfishing in Louisiana, is a fly fishing paradise for Redfish, Black Drum, and Cajun Permit.

Louisiana Fly Fishing for Redfish & Black Drum
Louisiana Fly fishing and 2 good old boys from Mississippi Details  
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Fly casting and presentation is vital for success. - Check it out -
Sight fishing is uncontrollable excitement. Click this to hear for yourself.
Flyfishing for Redfish in Louisiana What makes Louisiana fly fishing unique
Quinton Dickerson catches Lucille, a 25 pound Redfish. Click for details
Fishing is GREAT! The Corbett Clan has an outstanding day. Click for details

Coach Wally Bumpas, aka, the BumpMan earns the coveted Cajun Slam. Mayor of Dulac bestows Honorary CoonAss Status. Click for full story


"The waters teem with life, and fish from 4 to 11 pounds are the norm". Some get larger.
Large louisiana Redfish caught fly fishing
Jim Seegraves tricks a 29 1/2 pound Redfish on the fly.


Large Black Drum caught fly fishing
Shorty Menendez takes a 28 1/2 pound Black Drum on a Crab fly.

Fly Fishing for Louisiana Redfish. Cajun StyleWhen God made America, He looked into the future and saw the Cajun people that were to inhabit South Louisiana. He knew how much we liked to hunt and fish so He blessed us in a special way. We call it Lagniappe*. When it comes to fly fishing in Louisiana for Redfish, the marsh west of the Mississippi River Delta are second to none. It is the fertile silt that flows from much of North America and is spewed into the Gulf of Mexico by the "Mighty Mississippi River" that sets Louisiana fly fishing apart from the rest of the country. Once this precious commodity is released into the Gulf, the unceasing westerly eddies that flow from the Mississippi River skillfully places it's treasure right smack dab in our back yard. It is because of this that our marshes are so vast and naturally beautiful.

This seemingly unending marsh, is a virtual nursery that supports the growth and nurture of these fish from birth to early maturity. Louisiana Alligator not far from New OrleansThe waters teem with life, both below and above, and fish from 4 to 11 pounds are the norm. The isolated and natural habitant is unique and absolutely gorgeous. If a boat is seen within a mile of us, I'm ready to move. We go into the marsh to be alone; if we wanted company we'd go to New Orleans. :<)  The images that come to mind as I write this article bring peace to my soul. Being in the marsh is like going back in time.


What makes Louisiana stand out for Redfish is THERE ARE SO MANY OF THEM!

Large redfish caught in Louisiana
Click to read article

Fly Fishing for  Louisiana RedfishFly fishing in Louisiana for Redfish is a favorite sport of many fly casters. They are strong and beautiful fish that can't resist the right fly when presented properly. What makes Louisiana stand out for sight casting to Redfish is THERE ARE SO MANY OF THEM! It is not uncommon to sight hundreds of fish in a single day. It could be accurately stated that our shallow water ponds are infested with them! So if your casting skills lie anywhere between early beginner to expert we can take a short span of time and convert it into memories that will endure a lifetime*.

 


It's my main purpose to put you on top of fish that have no idea that we are anywhere around. That's why we get so CLOSE.

Giant Louisiana Redfish
The Big Boys are stacking up

Available Specie List
Redfish
Black Drum
Sheepshead - Cajun Permit -
Jack Crevalle
Black Tip Shark
Tripletail
On Occassion -  Speckled Trout  -  White Trout  -  Flounder  -  Spanish Mackerel
Birds of our Wetlands
American Oyster-catcher
I plan to add more birds as time allows.

There's so much to say. So many words needed to even attempt to describe the beauty and thrill of sight-fishing. Don't hesitate to e-mail; click here to send questions or comments.

Truth-be-known, I don't consider myself a fisherman. When I think of a fisherman, I think of someone who cast into water that's murky and too deep to see the bottom. They cast close to points, stumps, and various underwater structures. Constantly casting and stripping, casting and stripping, hoping to feel a strike. I used to fish Bass and at that time I considered myself a fisherman.

When you think of a fisherman, do images of a man standing at attention atop the deck of a shallow draft skiff, ever vigilant and constantly scanning the waters come to mine? Does a fisherman's eyes and reflexes mean so much to his success? Do fishermen diligently look for the slightest disturbance or the smallest flick of a tail or fin? Are most fishermen so sensitive that they can feel the radiation of the sun on their back before the actual rays can be seen?

I think of myself as a stalker; a hunter. When I push my skiff through the shallow waters I'm sensitive to the possible disturbance caused by tiny drops of water that might fall from the end of my pole. Just the slightest disturbance of a fly hitting the water can change the entire demeanor of a fish. It's my main purpose to put you on top of fish that have no idea that we are anywhere around. That's why we get so CLOSE.


Envision yourself standing on the deck, rod and line in hand, poised for action.

"There he is

he's comin', he's comin'

Do you see him?"

 

OK

Cast

Cast
Click this to hear for yourself.

Under favorable conditions, you can expect to cast only to fish that are previously spotted. And even at that, some people get sore casting arms.

An exercise to increase anticipation and excitement;

Sight Fishing Louisiana Redfish on the FlyAs you lay in bed the night before your trip (hopefully, you're already excited and can't get to sleep) begin to envision tomorrow's events. Try to image seeing as many Redfish as you possibly can and then double that amount. Envision yourself standing on the deck, rod and line in hand, poised for action. Quietly sliding through the lush marsh in a custom skiff that the captain designed and built just for this moment. See the Redfish crawling through the shallowest of water with their bellies shimmying through the mud and their backs in the air. Their tails are slowly and methodically wagging through the water as they forage for food. Imagine looking up and over to a very small quiet pond and spotting a large tail pointing towards the beautiful early morning orange sky. The water that drips form it's dark red tail that is crowned with an electric blue hue, glistens like diamonds. From the tower, with a whisper I communicate what's about to happen. I ask, "do you see him, do you know which way he is pointing"? You crouch down and tense up, prepared to cast. You sense the excitement from the sound of my voice. Calming you down I whisper, "not yet, not yet". All the while the skiff is being quietly poled closer and closer. Finally all is perfect and the cast is made. "Strip, Strip, Strip, OK he sees it; he's comin', he's comin', he's got it, Hit em', Hit em', Hit em'…"

Whoa, I don't know if you've got it, but I sure have the goose bumps. AND as much as I've fished that never gets old.

Flyfishing in Louisiana is an experience you'll not soon forget.

Fly fishing for Louisiana Black DrumGod's best to you and your family,

Capt. Dan Ayo
Shallow Minded Guide Service

"the days spent fishing end ever so quickly,
 though the memories keep surfacing throughout our lives"

 




"Whooo     Wheee…,   Yawl come and
we'll pass a good time cha' — Le Bon Temps Roulé *"

     *  Lagniappe (pronounced "lon yap") – it means getting a little something extra.

     *  Memories that endure a lifetime – My wife is unable to understand how I can forget what happened 10 minutes ago, but I can remember with vivid detail how so-and-so caught such-and-such a fish at-that-exact oyster shell 13 years ago. :<)

     *  Le Bon Temps Roulé (pronounced lay bon ton rulay) – This is the "unofficial" motto of Cajun Louisiana. It means "let the good times roll…"

Fly fishing in Louisiana
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Capt. Dan Ayo
E-mail    -  flyfisher@flyfishlouisiana.com
Website - Shallow Minded Guide Service
(985) 855-1381 before 8 PM Central Time

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